Archive

Tag Archives: Soul

Kon Summer[Photos Courtesy of LeanRock]

Its been at a clear and present DEFCON 5 status in the Loc Aut offices here for the last month since I emerged from my hiatus! The scene has been bumping with a diversity of sounds that would make anyone proud to call this city their home. ( I don’t care what all you haters say about Columbus, you should be proud of this city.)  I have been pouring my thoughts down on this page just trying to capture something of my excitement I feel of being part of our community. This weekend is no exception.  Not only do we got a open format noise, techno, experimental show, but DJ Kon is coming through with Jason Allen [Squared] to play the 2 year anniversary of Musicalityat Double Happiness tomorrow Friday, September 26. [Event Details HERE]

What? You haven’t heard of Kon. Well, you best do some digging to update yourself on who this artist is. [Good places to start are his interviews with Resident Advisor & LeanRock.] He is a one of those rare renaissance artists that has spent time building his skills writing, composing, dancing, graffiti writing, digging, and DJing. There are few cats that I know that have developed such a broad array of means of communicating and learning about music, art, and history. The only way I can describe him to folks is that he is dangerous. He is someone who will defy all means of placing him in a box. he understands what the real is and doesn’t deviate from this path. He doesn’t get bogged down in genre. He doesn’t play that game. Like any artists that is conversant in the vocabularies of sound, he spins what he feels. He spins the truth. He spins a historical tapestry that weaves a thread of emotion and soul through the past and present showing the interconnections of all our efforts to express ourselves through music. He spins up, down, around, and in back of all definitions you had for his art. This is why he is dangerous. He breaks down barriers. He breaks down our mental crutches that prevent us from communing with the sound and soul of the music. He comes to us as a humble, wise artist that is trying to share a message with us. Will we open ourselves up to what he wants to teach us?

I hope you do. You can catch him at Double Happiness with Jason Allen and the Musicality crew of Dedikate, Trueskills, and Craig Huckaby this Friday [Yes, that is tomorrow]. In the mean time, check out an example of his mix work and read the interview he was kind enough to do with me.

Mix Work:

Interview:

Local Autonomy: You have been involved with spinning, collecting, and producing music for 20-30 years. What does music and sound more broadly mean to the way you live and experience life?

Kon: Music is emotion manifested through sound, I am.. like many others a sponge. It chose me.

Local Autonomy: I am deeply interested in the history of music, and the role DJs and producers played as messengers or teachers. So you can imagine I was amp’d when I happened upon your interview with Lean and you said, “We are messengers, period.” What messages are you trying to pass on to people with your art?

Kon: Well, I am known to have some rather loud opinions.. and can be very outspoken, certainly passionate for sure. That said I am a student 1st, always learning. My brain is saturated with music and sounds, titles, pictures and years. Basically… if what I play or make resonates with people… cool, get on this ride with me, my story, my view, it consists of many styles, many sounds and I would hope at the very least brings other open minded, like minded folks together, if not thats cool too.. the door is open, you always have a choice.

Kon in the stacks[Photo Courtesy of LeanRock]

Local Autonomy: You have spent a lot of time digging through bins for records. I too really love just clearing my head and taking a walk through the bins to see where they take me. What have you learned about music and yourself taking the time to look through crates of vinyl?

Kon: As for hitting spots for records, I’ve learned to always eat and be on a full stomach, have a bottle of water with you, a portable is a plus…. and never judge a record by its cover. As for the music itself, its all about mood. Some records I got 20 years ago hit me in a different way now, that song I liked most may not even be my go to jam on that record anymore.

Local Autonomy: Listening to your productions, mixes, and edits, it is obvious that you are able to integrate the musical vocabularies of so many forms of music into your work. What role do you think learning and understanding the music vocabularies of disco, soul, funk, hip hop, and house has had in how you approach DJ’ing and producing?

Kon: Luckily for me I am a 70s baby. The singer song writer era. Politically charged times and the music showed us that. I was exposed to a vast amount of genres of music as a boy. Rock, pop, r&b, soul, new wave, punk… I always found authenticity within every one of those genres, be it the 1st B-52s, The Pretenders, Tom Petty, Prince, Cameo, Souxie & The Banshees, The Clash, Chic, Stevie, etc, etc.
Disco came to be popular in the late 70s and early 80s. Most times I never fit in with the rest of the kids as they were into things for their own age so to speak. I was hanging out with adults and my musical palette was a direct reflection of it.
As for hip hop tho….it showed me how to put it all together, make sense of it all.
The 1st rap records are disco records. The 80s came and the advent of sampling came into play. Things have never been the same. I combine all that I have soaked up, and I dunno… I guess it just it what it is. No rules, and if there are any break them.

Kon Tag[Photos Courtesy of LeanRock]

Kon on Twitter

Kon Blog

Kon Mixwork on Soul Clap

Introduction: Connections to the Past 

For those that pay attention to this humble little outpost, it may be obvious that I am much more interested in hearing and sharing other peoples ideas than in invoking my own voice.  I rarely ever post my thoughts on our community and my relation to it. I am much more comfortable being the learner and the sharer than being the “voice” of our community. I have too much respect for the music, the listeners, and the community to pretend I speak for all of us. However, every six months or so, I come to a point where my conversations with people from our community prompt me to want to discuss a topic that lies right beneath the surface of all our actions. You all have indulged me in the past as I have explored how I re-found my romanticism for the music in a disenchanted age of fabricated authenticity (Read That Essay Here) and how I believe our scene will live on long beyond the boom and bust cycles of dance music popularity due to the traditions, sounds, and norms that create our common cultural infrastructure (Read That Essay Here). Well, It seems my experiences have come to a head once again, and I am ready to share some more of the ideas floating around our community.

Over the past few months, I have been fortunate enough to speak to some very special people with beautiful, powerful ideas about the SOUL of music and community. These conversations have had a profound influence on me not only as a listener, but also a human being. These ideas of the soul of the music have re-calibrated and fine tuned how I approach this local autonomy project. They have prompted me to move away from discussions of our community infrastructure and our fights with media hype. I am not moving toward a new direction; our collective soul.

When I say I am seeking out our collective soul, I am talking about trying to pinpoint some of the common ideas and values that we all believe in, use to guide our action, and make our attempts to build and protect a community meaningful. A simpler way to think about the collective soul is to consider it as a sort of guiding philosophy that is filled with all the values and attitudes we use to relate to each other, the music, and the rituals in our community. I believe that it is only though the collective soul that we are ever able to get in touch with the the very heart-strings of our community to see the deep meaning in all our actions together. I believe it is only through the collective soul that we are ever able to truly understand the importance of building a thriving, creative community full of sound producers, synthesizers, and listeners. I believe that it is only through the collective soul that we are ever able to understand our community as a sacred privilege to never be taken for granted.   This essay attempts to point out three of the broad values that I believe make up our collective soul in Columbus. It is my hope that by putting these values into works we can get more in touch with the deep beauty and significance of our common action in our city.

One: Mutual Obligation

One key value that unites many people within our community is a sort of mutual obligation and trust between people. There is an unspoken rule in our community that one needs to help and support the other people working within our community if they want to expect that help in turn.  Its not just our common love of a set of frequencies and vibrations that fosters this sort of outward-focused love and loyalty to the person next to us. This does establish a shared vocabulary we all speak, but it goes deeper than this. This mutual obligation and trust is hardwired into us through the fact that in our small community we know we need that person next to us if we are to share the messages and emotions that the music has to offer. As a result, most everything we do to build our community is not for us. It is all centered around a focus on helping others and spreading the message of the music.

Now some of you may scoff at this characterization, but you need to hold up a second. Its too easy to explain this away by saying that people are only rationally motivated and only do things that will help themselves in the long run. This is, in effect, making the argument that all our entire community is held together by a ceaseless stream of ego plays for status, prestige, and money. I am not prepared to make such a statement, because there is not much ego, prestige, and money to be made in what we are doing. Rather, I think we have quite different motivations for doing what we do in Columbus. The value we place on mutual obligation creates a community that transcends these rational concerns alone and instills in all of us an altruistic, love-based motivation to act. It is this altruism that has us asking: “What can we do for our community?” and not “what can I do to help myself?”

When I first entered the community, I was quite taken by the level of trust that develops among people in our community. Building and maintaining a community results in the establishment of deep friendship and camaraderie on an artistic and spiritual level that few common activities can match. You can see the results of this trust and loyalty in the massive events thrown by multiple dance music organizations or the events that bring together multiple “electronic” music communities. You can see it in the generous act of all the people that donated performances and sound to the BLUR event I helped throw for the Fuse Factory. You can see it in the time people take to answer questions and make mixes for this humble project. You can see it in the humble act of someone helping move equipment at the end of the night. You can see it in the willingness to pay 5-10 dollars to go to an event to support the artists that performed. In all these acts, we come to know who we are and who others are by giving of ourselves and experiencing the generosity of others. It is through this core value of mutual obligation that we begin to love one another and protect the community that helps us understand more deeply what it means to be human.

Two: Music As A Teacher & The Fellowship of Learners

The second core value that unites us is our orientation toward the music. We all value the messages and teachings that music has to offer us. We are the sort of self-selecting, deep-sea divers that are not content to just passively listen to music. We have a burning desire to tunnel deeply into the machinations and history of the sound to understand how and why it was created. Through this orientation, music becomes more than just a good beat and collection of synth pops. It takes on a quasi-magical quality that propels our bodies and minds out of  the mundane into the interconnection of history, place, and vibrating sound waves. It becomes a teacher about the human experience and our place in the universe. It becomes a spiritual repository where we look to learn lessons about how to love, rise above, and celebrate being alive. Viewed through this orientation, music is no longer just a hobby for us. It becomes a blueprint for engaged living.

Above our common approach to music as a teacher, we are all united in a fellowship of learning on the path to musical discovery. When we open ourselves to understanding what music can teach us, we are embracing a common path of learning and curiosity. This is a vital commonality, because it shows that we are not just united by what we listen to and are interested in. No, it is much deeper than that. We are unified by our common love of learning and being willing to continually change how we think the world in line with our interactions with others. This is something I have witnessed directly in myself and others. My love of learning overlaps fundamentally with all the other people in this community. How else would I be able to talk to complete strangers about the fundamental importance of music for 2-3 hours if we did not share some fundamental curiosity and membership in the fellowship of learning? How else would a project like mine even be able to get one reader if people were not curious and wanted to learn how other artists in their community approached learning and working with sound? How else would countless others in our community with seemingly different tastes and interests be willing to collaborate and appreciate each others work? Yes, we do share a fundamental belief in music as a teacher, but above all, we also share the fact that we are all but humble learners on this common path of life trying to live an engaged and worthwhile existence.

Three: The Sacred Rituals of our Community

The final core value that I feel unites us is our orientation toward all the practices associated with being a part of our community. Whether we consciously know it or not, we all approach listening, spinning, creating, dancing, and curating events as sacred acts of self expression. We all exude a humble reverence while doing them that shows our deep appreciation for being able to express our singularity and experience others expressions. This appreciation has profoundly altered how many of us approach the world around us. We have let our respect and reverence flow freely into our actions and it has transformed mundane acts in nightclubs into spiritual technologies that help us transcend this world of flesh and bone and burn wildly on fire in the Churches of Soul around our city. Through this perspective, our practices of creating and listening become our common instruments to sing the triumphs and sorrows of living in this imperfect world that is so immensely gorgeous in its flawed condition. What else is there to being human than humbling yourself before a practice that lets you express deeply these fundamental truths of our world.

Beyond the power of self expression, we are all united by approaching these sacred practices as parts of rituals of renewal, healing, and rites of passage. We do not hold these spiritual technologies in such a high regard just because they allow us to express ourselves. This is obviously an important part of it, but they also satisfy a much more fundamental need. We all continually re-use the solemn rites of the dancefloor every weekend with its practices of dancing, mixing, creating, and listening because it nourishes our soul with reminders of the love and beauty that surrounds us and heals our wounds inflicted in the dramas of life.  Even further, these rituals in the Church of Soul help us get over and symbolize us making our transition toward love, generosity, and humble learning. Viewed through this perspectives, each of these practices is nothing more than one star in the constellation of the services of the Church of Soul that we all continually draw on in order to re-fill our hearts for dealing with the troubles of our times. I have felt the power of these rituals in every room and show that I have gone to in our city. I know you have felt it to. Why else would we smile at complete strangers and be willing to trust them to share a very intimate experience of expressing the core of oneself? Why else does time seem to slow and space seem to fall away as we get in touch with that rhythm? Why else would all colors, smells, and sound seem to be more vivid in these moments of ceremonial connection? Why else would getting little sleep and dancing till the middle of the night leave you feeling fully charged and ready to love again? No matter if you are religious or not, we are all united in seeking out the sacred and beauty of life through the rituals of the dancefloor. We are all united in continually seeking out healing and nourishment in these solemn rites.

Conclusion: Breaking Down Division In These Rationalized, Categorical Times

I feel that pointing to and celebrating our unity through the collective soul is an incredibly important act in these rational, categorical times. “Dance music” in our city and all over the world has to some degree fragmented into infinitesimally small groups of people all exploring their own highly specialized category (genre) of music. When we break off into these small nodes and define ourself through sounds we are really closing ourselves off to all that the music and the community can teach us. We are allowing powerful organizations, whose goal is profit, to dictate to us how we will run and act in our community. It was these large-scale promotional groups, blogs, and recording companies that have always saw a potential pay day in twisting very loose, local definitions for genres [which were nothing more than ambiguous labels for people to use to understand the music anyways] into a rigid moral universe of Right|Wrong, Good|Bad, Cool|Uncool to sell us music, experiences, and identities.  When we continue to divide ourselves off by genre, we are allowing these organizations to trap our communities and ourselves in iron cages of genrification and monetization that suck the soul out of the music and community.  Luckily, these iron cages are never welded shut and can be sold for scrap metal if we have the desire.

Our collective soul lies right beneath the surface of most of what we do. Some individuals may be more intentional about how it guides their action, but we are all guided by forces outside the world constructed by blogs, promotional grops, and record companies. We all crave to learn about and get in touch with the ancient traditions that naturally emerged from the foundational moments of our community. We all crave to unify our community and be more in touch with the sacredness of our common practices and rituals. I think the road we can use to get there is a more intentional inclusion of the very values highlighted in our collective soul. Let’s stop falling into the trap of talking about how we are going to push the scene to get bigger and continue to think and talk about how we can all come together better and help each other (Mutual Obligation).   Let’s continue to talk about what we can learn from the music, events, and each other and not just how we can throw a well attended party (Music as a teacher; Fellowship of learners). Let’s continue to use a different metric of success for our community. One that keeps in mind that success can be measured in the degree to which we humbled ourselves before the practices and rituals of our community. One that takes seriously self-expression and finding healing in ritual as key indicators of a good event, production, or set.  It is only then that we can step out of the iron cage and allow ourselves to full express our collective soul. It is only then that we truly embrace the humanity behind all that we do in this city and take back our community for ourselves and no one else.

Musuem

“If you can talk you can sing
If you can walk you can dance
I believe that rhythm and movement is natural in our bodies
Dance is a primal form of communciation and its very deeply rooted in us
Singing and dancing together is what binds a community together
It is a way of expressing joy, sorrow, and passion

It has been recorded since before the dawn of time
that spiritual leaders and healers were first dancers
And in many cases the dances of Africa are thousands of years old
And I pay homage to the ancestors and elders of this tradition
Traditionally certain dances were used specifically for healing body, mind, or spirit
These dances come from a people that did not separate spirituality from everyday life
African dances were performed for any significant event or rite of passage from birth to death”

“African Healing Dance” — At One Ft Atjazz from his Mix: “If You Can Walk, You Can Dance” (Make Sure To Click the Link Below and Listen While Reading For Best Results)

It was a cold, blustery afternoon a month or two ago when I first got to talk to Seth “Dedikate” Carter, one of the key people behind the forward-thinking Columbus dance and music force Musicality. Strangely, before I even met Dedikate in person, I thought he and I would get along.  I had been listening to his mixes and following the remnants of his Musicality events through pictures and stories. I was truly moved by his music-first approach and his desire to bring our community an event dedicated to giving us a safe space for listeners, dancers, and artists to explore the rhythm of life without pretense or hype.  As I learned more about him, it seemed that he and I walked along a similar path in life and I felt an intense desire to share his story and worldview with our community.

Musicality

I came to our lunch meeting with my regular blinders that were keyed into what I hoped to hear from Dedikate, but, as always, the universe had different plans for the conversation. I had hoped to learn about Dedikate’s historical story and how he has been able to quietly bring world-class talent to our city. Quickly though, the conversation turned away from Dedikate’s historical narrative and his accomplishments toward his spiritual approach to sound, energy, and the rhythm of life:  “I believe there is a spirit and energy in everything. That’s why the trees make noise with the wind blows, we have personalities, and you can hear somebody walking. I am trying to say that energy is just energy. All energy falls into a rhythm if you let it. That’s what makes music so beautiful. It’s an expression of energy.” As that conversation turned toward his deep passion for sharing beautiful, inspiring music with people in our community, it became expressly obvious that the story of Dedikate and Musicality isn’t one of individual striving or accomplishment. The story is explicitly about erecting a Church Of Soul in our city that inspires people to think positively, embrace the person next to them, and keep on walking confidently in the direction of their dreams. Its a story that cuts to the heart of the ideas, values, and morals that we all share in our common endeavors. It cuts to the heart of our Collective Soul.

spoonful

Dedikate’s message has resounded within my daily life to the extent now that I see the Soul of our community and the music everywhere. Looking back on all the people who I have interacted with in our community,  I see the Soul seeping out of every action we have undertaken to share music and collaborate on common events.  From exploring new venues and sounds to reaching out to new audiences, I see Soul. From the creation of flyers and events to the production of music and mixes, I see Soul. From the desire to break out of formulaic rules and the drive to write those rules anew, I see Soul. Through this collective soul we all share, I see the good will, passion, and pure desire of people in our city to connect to and create something bigger than themselves.

Viewed within Dedikate’s powerful perspective, Soul becomes more than just a word. Soul becomes more than just a genre of music. It becomes a philosophy, a way of life, an animating energy of rhythm:  Soul. That immovable force. That power that flows through us and around us and is expressed in our movements. Soul. That unexplainable interconnectedness. That common frequency we all vibrate to on this solar powered jukebox. Soul. That most divine inspiration. That revealer of the path to your dreams. Soul. What we all share. What we all strive to find in our lives. Soul. Meaning. Found right in the place you least expected it. In your next step, word, or thought.

Poster

We are fortunate enough to have an opportunity to directly experience an event curated by Dedikate tonight (Friday, May 31st) at Double Happiness (482 S. Front Street, Columbus, OH) when he spins with Trueskills, DJ Nimbus, & Malik Alston with live percussion accompaniment from Craig Huckaby. (EVENT DETAILS CLICK HERE) Make sure to check out the sounds of this wonderful musician and get in touch more deeply with this monthly event. Until then, check out his interview to step deeper into his world:

Local Autonomy: What does music and sound more broadly mean to the way you live and experience life?

Dedikate: That is a deep question. My life fits in a rhythm to begin with; it’s always been that way, even before I started dancing. You can ask anyone who is close to me and they will tell you that music is involved in anything I do. I don’t even have a television in my house. The minute I come home I start playing music or searching for music or whatever. That is in the physical world, meaning what I see and hear outside of myself. Inside my mind I find myself constantly playing a song (loud) in my head regardless if it is one I have just made up or someone else’s.  My wife tells people the strands of my DNA are made up of musical notes, lol.

A lot of it has to do with my spiritual background. I believe there is a spirit and energy in everything. That’s why the trees make noise with the wind blows, we have personalities, and you can hear somebody walking. I am trying to say that energy is just energy. All energy falls into a rhythm if you let it. That’s what makes music so beautiful. It’s an expression of energy. It’s even better when it’s live and there are four members, for example. Then that makes four elements of energy. The best thing is that we have learned how to record that and replay it over and over again. Because music will say things differently to you over time, depending on where you are at in your life. That’s the best part about it. It’s a way of being able to express to the world what is happening in the moment of now.

dj

LA: We spoke about our common love of the very diverse sounds of Motor City Soul. What is this music and what does it mean to you?

D: Detroit in itself has its own rhythm. I feel like there is just an essence (soul) of the city itself. Also, the music history, in all its genres has been so thick. If you are a native, it’s impossible for that not to have an effect on you. I know people from Detroit who aren’t even musicians and know the same information about music that I do. It is just part of life out there. That’s why I always love learning new stuff that comes out of there. A lot of time I really try to not judge it or classify it as a genre because there is something new coming out there all the time, its just music.

Virtually everyone that has made music in that City has inspired me in some way or another. Aretha Franklin, Jeff Mills, Moodymann, Al Hudson, Donald Byrd, Iggy Pop, Dennis Coffee, Rick Wilhite, Theo Parrish, Marcellus Pittman, Mike and Craig Huckaby, Dilla, Royce, Andres, Kevin Saunderson, David Ruffin, to name a few. That’s not even the half when you consider the people that came through there to record on Motown, Ashford, Birdie, Submerge, Metroplex, Tamla, Sound Signature, Mahogani, Temple, Tribe, Transmat, etc. The craziest part about Detroit is that even after all I’ve mentioned, it still doesn’t scratch the surface of all of the music that has come out of there. I really have a humbling gratitude for that place when I play there.

LA: You came to house, techno, etc. by way of hip-hop and bboying. Walk me through the process of what got you into (for lack of a better term) dance music genres.

D: Well, I have always listened to electronic music. I started going to ELEmental parties when I was 14. They were a group of people that pushed the boundaries for music in Columbus. They threw awesome parties and got people together in the name of music. I grew up going to those parties and I also followed rock bands like the Grateful Dead and Phish from state to state for years. I learned a lot about all types of music from that experience alone.

Breaking

I started listening to hip-hop when I was about six years old. Eric B and Rakim, NWA, Beastie Boys, Run DMC and later on Ice T, BDP, Slick Rick, etc. Hip Hop always remained a constant in my life all throughout my endeavors and I started attempting to bboy in 1996 but never took it seriously until 1999. I’ve pretty much been dancing ever since. Give or take injuries here and there. Through that I learned several other types of dance like house, salsa and freestyle. I would just go to the club and dance forever. During that process I would dig for all the music I heard at bboy jams or house clubs, etc. I travelled a lot so I was always hearing what was brand new and during the time there was a lot of stuff coming out. I would dig in whatever way I could, whether I was at the record store, online, through people and mixtapes, record shows, flea markets, etc. Just to be able to find that music, and when I began taking djing seriously around 2005, everything just fell into place. I began djing bboy battles and people liked what I played so I decided to get more involved and do it somewhat professionally for some time.

Dancing

LA: What does the art of DJing and music production mean to you?

D: Djing to me is like telling a story or giving a description of your experiences in life. All of the music I play I have found a deep personal connection with and I want to share that with the listener. I approach djing also from the standpoint of educating the listener as well. A lot of music was never made popular due to many reasons like poor advertisement, lack of financial backing, etc. A lot of times those artists were truly gifted and had a lot to give to the world. I believe people deserve a chance to hear that. I dig for records to be able to share that music with other people.

Records

I am still trying to find my sound with music production. I also haven’t been able to fully set up my studio as well and it’s killing me. I think music is a universal language and if you come at it with an honest approach, people will relate to you. It has to happen freely, otherwise it doesn’t come out honest, and frankly I haven’t had the time to commit to it, although I plan to a lot in the future. I also think using actual instruments is essential. There is something about how you approach an instrument in the first place that makes your sound unique to you and you only. I have a few instruments I can play mediocrely like a bass, piano, conga, and harmonica. When I get my studio situated I definitely plan on giving a piece of myself to the world, musically.

LA: Your Musicality project has really pushed a Music first approach to shows in our town and has been hosting some of the best talent from around the Midwest–Gerald Mitchell, Rahaan, Terrance Parker, and Rick Wilhite. What is the philosophy behind the project?

D: My goal is to create an environment that is comfortable for everyone to be able to relax and come experience music they may have never heard before. It is very centered in dancing because of my background, but if you come its not a requirement to dance. I really just wanted to create a night that people know that will be a solid stream of feel good music. Music that is undeniably good and expose people to it in a way that is not too “in your face”. My goal isn’t even to make money off of the night, its more so to be able to bring people here that would normally never come and play in Columbus on a regular tour. So far it has really worked out and I have a lot of surprises in store. I plan on throwing special events with some fairly big names in the future. I also would like to expand and bring more people from Ohio in general to my nights. It’s always a good time and I have gotten a lot of good feedback from people. Im definitely not going anywhere and plan on throwing larger events in the future! Hope to see everyone out. 

Check out the rest of Dedikate’s extensive mix back catalogue at his Mixcloudfollow Musicality Columbus on Facebook for updates on their next shows, check out their websiteAND go to Musicality tonight!


CS2149977-02A-BIG

A few wise individuals taught me that techno is supposed to have soul. The type of soul forged from an artist taking inanimate tools like analogue synthesizers, drum programmers, and computer interfaces and making them sing of the human experience. The type of soul built from creating when few are looking for no other purpose than to express oneself. The type of soul that makes a techno track more than just a collection of rhythm, pulses, and discordant sounds, but a living, breathing force of nature. Whenever I listen to techno, I go searching for the soul of the work.

At the core of Panel Trax 031, I found eleven remixes from ten different artists that not only pay tribute to the 15+ year career of Chance McDermott, but also breath new energy into the musical ideas he was playing with in those releases. If you are unfamiliar with McDermott’s work then you are missing out. He has carved out a unique approach to techno that harnesses multiple layers of drum patterning with skittish, synthesized loops to create dense, immersive techno. Columbus, OH based artists like FBK & Plural along with others from around the globe pay homage to this man’s style, but twist the originals to work within their own unique approaches. FBK‘s remix of “Blonde Xpress” marks a distinct departure from the original production. He brings a pounding rhythm to the front of the track in his characteristic style found on his recent releases on Diametric and Absoloop Records.

Plural reworks all the elements of McDermott’s original “Blackbird” and puts them together into an interpretation that ebbs and flows through periods of tense restraint and outright frenzy characteristic of his works on 6one6 and Audio Textures Records.

The hazier, ghost-like treatments deployed by Alexander Dniel, Synus0006 & Maks, Laslowb, and The Machinists are characteristic of the core aesthetic of the Panel Trax catalogue that highlights the darker side of the musical form.

While the works of Ozaka, Scott Fraser, Matt Saderlan, Francesco Bonora & Mirko provide funk-filled remixes that add in touches of acid, cacophony, and four to the floor rhythms to McDermott’s past tracks.

In all, these artists showcase an intricate understanding of soulful techno and skillfully deploy their hardware to sing hymns of praise or the blues.

Make sure to check it out if you get a chance. I know I have enjoyed listening to and living with these tracks over the past week. I was richly rewarded with works from artists I had not encountered before and others I am more familiar with. I was especially excited to see FBK & Plural on the release since they have continued to garner attention outside of our city for their excellent production work individual and collectively as the Fallen.  You can find the release on Beatport or JUNOdownloads.

Panel Trax Records

Chance McDermott and remember I Interviewed him too–Read that HERE

%d bloggers like this: